FINDING INNER PEACE | DAY 1

Welcome to the first day of the 7 Days of Salina. Today’s topic is all about inner peace and how to achieve it. So what exactly is inner peace? What the difference between peace and inner peace? Why is it so important to achieve inner peace? There’s just way too many questions but don’t worry I will guide you through everything in detail.

In Taoism (Chinese philosophy), it means self acceptance. I will be writing about inner peace with this perspective because it’s the best and simplest way to describe what inner peace really means. Peace has a very simple meaning: being away from disturbance and where everything is calm. Inner peace? Well that’s something else now. Self acceptance; how hard can it be?  Well it’s not as easy as it may sound, trust me I’m talking about experience. Let me elaborate what self acceptance/inner peace is: no matter how much society tries to bring you down, you’re strong enough to stand up to them and put your middle finger in the air and say, “I don’t care about what you think of me because I am proud of who I am and how I am. No one can take that away from me so quit trying to do so.”

The way of finding inner peace is to follow the path. But which path exactly? There are so many; the bumpy ones with a shorter ride or the smooth one with the longer ride. So which path? I’ll tell you: the smooth one with the longer ride. Maybe most of you chose the opposite of what I did because society always tells you to go through the rough times and then you’ll be fine. Society never shares the entire truth and let me tell you why I believe this. I believe that you shouldn’t just ‘go through’ the rough times but to make something better out of the negative. To fix it. As you go along your longer path, you will get to experience the journey. The journey. That’s the key to inner peace. Focus on the journey and not the destination even if you think that the journey is a bad one because when you will reach your destination, you will find out that there might be another path to ride. When you will learn how to accept the journey instead of the destination, I can promise you that you will barely come across another path to ride. What I mean by that is that you’ll learn to find the positive in a situation. If you achieve this, you will come to learn that the ‘bad’ situations aren’t so bad after all.

To those having difficulties of putting the past where it belongs or is going through something, let me share a little story with you. I was reading a book called The Divine Reality: God, Islam and the Mirage of Atheism by Hamza Andreas Tzortzis and I came across a point where the writer describes the past as illusions and not memories. Here’s how it goes:

Imagine one evening you receive a call from David, one of your old school friends you use to sit next to during science lessons. You haven’t spoken to him for years, but you remember the weird questions he use to ask you. Although you found him pleasant, you were not a fan of his ideas. Reluctantly you answer the phone. After a brief exchange of greetings, he invites you to have lunch with him. You half-heartedly accept his invitation. During lunch he asks, “Can I tell you something?” You reply positively, and he begins to express to you what you haven’t heard before: “You know, the past – like what you did yesterday, last year, and all the way back to your birth – didn’t really happen. It’s just an illusion in your head. So my question to you is, do you believe the past exists?” As a rational person you do not agree with his assertion and you reply, “What evidence do you have to prove that the past does not exist?” Now rewind the conversation, and imagine you spent the whole meal without trying to prove that the past is something that really happened. Which scenario would you prefer? The reason why you prefer the first scenario is because you – like the rest of the reasonable people out there – regard the reality of the past as a self – evident truth. As with all the self-evident truths, if someone challenges them, the burden of proof is on the one who has questioned them. Now let’s apply this to a theist – atheist dialogue.

A theist invites his atheist friend for dinner, and during the meal the atheist asserts, “You know, God does not exist. There’s no evidence for his existence. However, has the theist adopted the right strategy? Before we present a positive case for God’s existence, shouldn’t we be probing why questioning God’s existence is the assumed default question? It shouldn’t be: Does God exist? Rather, it should be: What reasons do we have to reject His existence?

When I started to think more in dept of what that meant, it made more sense to me in a way and it helped me release the past that I’ve been holding onto for so long. If you start thinking about the past as just illusions, then you’ll be more easily focused on the present. I’m not trying to say that you should fool yourself into believing that. Sometimes it’s good to remember your past, to remind you of experiences you’ve had and therefore stops you from doing the wrong thing. But if you are constantly stabbing yourself over the past and what you could’ve done instead, it’ll help you so much, no matter how crazy it sounds.

Now, before I end this post I want to remind you that every post is interconnected. This means that every post will be connected to a previous one or the next. I find it really important for others to understand how much of a life changer it can be to do these things. Sometimes we aren’t appreciative enough about ourselves and I want to dedicate this to everyone who feels that way. Everyone matters. Anyway, I don’t want to write very long posts and then make you bored to the point where you just give up reading. If you’ve reached till here, I really appreciate it haha! Without making this post any longer than it already is, I hope you all have a wonderful day and try to find your inner peace. Remember what Lao Tzu said: “Be content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.”

Much love,

Salina.

4 Comments

  1. Thank you! And no, I’m not trying to say that the past has no meaning. In fact, the past is what shapes us into who we’ve become today. As I’ve explained in this post:
    “If you start thinking about the past as just illusions, then you’ll be more easily focused on the present. I’m not trying to say that you should fool yourself into believing that. Sometimes it’s good to remember your past, to remind you of experiences you’ve had and therefore stops you from doing the wrong thing. But if you are constantly stabbing yourself over the past and what you could’ve done instead, it’ll help you so much, no matter how crazy it sounds.”
    Therefore, explains that you shouldn’t constantly stab yourself over your past mistakes. Not that the past has no meaning.

LEAVE A REPLY